Manufacturers are Ultimately Liable for Injuries Resulting from their Defective Medications

In 2005, the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reported 202,300 injuries and 20 deaths involving children 15 years old and below. These injuries and death are all toy-related.

Defects are not only found in toys. There are as many harmful defects as the number of the kinds of products available in the market, including vehicles, food and pharmaceutical products. With regard to food, an instance of food poisoning occurred in 2011; this was the listeriosis outbreak. Its effect was immediate, causing infection in 146 people, 30 deaths and 1 miscarriage – all those affected were from 28 different states.

Another type of harmful product is defective drugs, especially prescription drugs, which are formulated to serve as safe and effective treatment to serious health conditions. However, instead of delivering the cure they are intended to provide, many of them cause adverse effects that cause harm in patients and/or further worsen patients’ original health complaints.

Before being introduced into the market, a drug needs to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration first. Before approval by the FDA, however, the drug’s manufacturer first needs to show proofs that the drug has been tested and proven safe and effective for patient use.

Despite the extensive research and tests conducted by pharmaceutical experts, many drugs still get reported to the FDA as increasing the risk of the development of more serious illnesses or causing death in some of those who use them; hundreds of prescription drugs have been linked to either of the two or both. This may be due to either of these two reasons: first, since the drug companies are the ones sponsoring the tests conducted on their medical products, some keep the negative results detected from the medicine and submit only the positive outcome of the tests to the FDA. Second, despite the real effectiveness and safeness of the medicine, the patient’s immune system may not be strong enough to fight possible drug side-effects, or the patient may have a medical health condition or is taking another medication, causing the drug from working safely and effective in him/her. This is why it is important that doctors explain to their patients everything concerning the drug that they prescribe; about the drug’s possible effects and what health condition and which medication will not work well with it.

The Amerio Law says, “Hundreds of new drugs and medical products are approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States every year. In turn, they are utilized by thousands of patients suffering from a variety of ailments or medical issues. Sometimes, a drug or medical product is released to the public, and it is later found to be dangerous or defective, thus causing serious injuries… even death in some cases.

While many drugs have dangerous side effects, others have the potential to cause much more serious, long-term personal injury. Although the FDA plays a regulatory role in approving and monitoring their safety after approval of a drug, the manufacturer is ultimately liable for any injuries resulting from their medications… and they MUST be held accountable!”

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